Dental implants


What are dental implants?

A dental implant is actually a replacement for the root or roots of a tooth.

Like tooth roots, dental implants are secured in the jawbone and are not visible once surgically placed.

They are used to secure crowns (the parts of teeth seen in the mouth), bridgework or dentures by a variety of means.

They are made of titanium, which is lightweight, strong and biocompatible, which means that it is not rejected by the body.

Titanium and titanium alloys are the most widely used metals in both dental and other bone implants, such as orthopedic joint replacements. Dental implants have the highest success rate of any implanted surgical device.

Am I a candidate for dental implants?

Generally speaking, if you have lost teeth you are a candidate for dental implants.

It is important that you are in good health, however, as there are some conditions and diseases that can affect whether dental implants are right for you. 

It is important to let your dental surgeon know all about your medical status (past and present) together with all medications you are taking.

Which is the success percentage?

Modern dental implant surgery can reach success percentages around 96-97%.

Our clinic ensures compliance with the fundamental rules and protocols in order to assure the maximum level of success:

  1. Thorough examination and assessment of general health status
  1. Bone quality and quantity check-up
  1. General oral check-up and, if needed, we prescribe a dental care session
  1. Radiological assessment (x-ray or 3D dental scan)
  1. Absolute sterile surgery (operators, instruments and environment)
  1. Minimum impact surgery according to latest and up to date protocols
  1. We use high quality implants certified CE (Conformité Européenne)
  1. Dentures attached to implants are placed ensuring the best balance, occlusion and  well satisfy the aesthetic function

Dental implant VERSUS bridgeworks and removable dentures

Bone needs stimulation to maintain its form and density. There is a 25% decrease in width of bone during the first year after tooth loss and an overall decrease in height over the next few years.

Because dental implants fuse to the bone, they stabilize it and prevent further bone loss. Resorption is a normal and inevitable process in which bone is lost when it is no longer supporting or connected to teeth. Only dental implants can stop this process and preserve the bone.

There are other advantages to implants, too. If you have an implant to replace a single tooth, there is no need to cut down the teeth either side of it. If you had a bridge, your dentist would need to do this and fit crowns to these teeth to support the bridge.

Normal dentures often mean that your eating and drinking are affected because the dentures may move about. But teeth attached to an implant don't cause this problem, because they are anchored to the bone more firmly than natural teeth.

Do implants hurt?

Placing an implant is often easier than taking a tooth out and is usually done using a simple local anaesthetic. You will not feel any pain at the time but, just like after an extraction, you may feel some discomfort during the week after the surgery.

Sometimes your dentist might give you a sedative if you are very nervous or if the case is a complicated one. General anaesthetics are rarely used for implants and are generally only used for very complicated cases.

How are dental implants placed?

Placing dental implants requires a surgical procedure in which precision channels are created in the jawbone, often using a surgical guide.

The implants are then fitted into the sites so that they are in intimate contact with the bone.

They generally require two to six months to fuse to the bone before they can have tooth restorations attached to them to complete the process.

Immediately (at the same time an implant is placed) or after a period of healing, an abutment is attached to the implant.

This is a device that “abuts” or joins the implant to a tooth form called a crown, which replaces the tooth part you see in the mouth.

It will hold a custom-made crown that the dental laboratory will fabricate and match to your existing teeth. The custom crown is cemented or screwed onto the abutment to permanently keep it in place. Once the crown is in place, it should be indistinguishable from your natural teeth.

What is guided bone regeneration?

Grafting bone into the extraction sockets at the time of tooth loss or removal can help preserve bone volume needed for implant placement. Surgical techniques are also available to regenerate (re-grow) bone that has been lost, to provide the necessary bone substance for anchoring implants. In fact, a primary reason to consider dental implants to replace missing teeth is the maintenance of jawbone.


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